Chief Releases Multi-Depth In-Wall Boxes

April 8, 2014
Chief, provider AV mounting solutions, talked to customers about in-wall boxes to find out what was working well and what more could be done to solve installation problems.

"We found out they wanted good trim kits and covers that could be ordered separately to match real world installation conditions. Many times, the boxes are installed by electricians long before the AV installation takes place, and attaching flanges and covers at that stage works against the construction," said Luke Westin, product manager.

In some regions, it's becoming more common for commercial construction to use thinner stud bays, Westin said. Installers needed boxes that allowed for shallower depths.

Chief engineers took this feedback to create an in-wall box with the features to meet various requirements.

Features include:

- Break away edges change the depth of the box in order to match either 3.5-inch or 2.5-inch stud bays (89 or 64 mm)
- Separate and/or pre-configured ordering options for box, flange and cover to coincide with the timing of installation in the field, and at no additional MSRP or list pricing cost
- Ample space to hold commonly used video scalers
- Packaging that also serves as a wall template and temporary construction cover
- Easier knockouts to quickly customize the box to specific needs on site
- Integrated universal zip tie anchor points
- Cover with breakaway knockouts for cable routing and ventilation as well as tamper proof security
- Ability to mount to studs or, with the addition of optional flange, to drywall
- The in-wall boxes come in two sizes. The PAC525 is 9 x 14.25 x 3.9" (229 x 362 x 99 mm), and the PAC526 is 14.25 x 14.25 x 3.9" (362 x 362 x 99 mm).

Both in-wall boxes come in black, but the flanges and covers can be ordered in black or white and are paintable to blend with any environment. They work with any dual stud wall mount.

Want to read more stories like this?
Get our Free Newsletter Here!

Comments

Photo GalleriesMore Galleries >
Leon HQ Tour 2017

Residential Systems' Jeremy Glowacki and Leon Speaker's Noah Kaplan at the end of the tour

Leon HQ Tour 2017

Inside Leon's anechoic chamber

Leon HQ Tour 2017

Leon's hands-on manufacturing process

Leon HQ Tour 2017

Leon's hand-wound crossover

Leon HQ Tour 2017

Unique sculpture is on display throughout Leon. Much of it was created by Leon CEO Noah Kaplan.

Leon HQ Tour 2017

Leon sources its drivers from Israel.

Leon HQ Tour 2017

A warning before entering Leon's engineering department

Leon HQ Tour 2017

Inside Leon's engineering department

Leon HQ Tour 2017

Leon's engineers at work

Leon HQ Tour 2017

Leon's demo room

Leon HQ Tour 2017

A wide shot of Leon's final assembly

Leon HQ Tour 2017

Here's another stage of assembly

Leon HQ Tour 2017

Leon's picturesque headquarters hallway

Leon HQ Tour 2017

More original artwork from Noah Kaplan

Leon HQ Tour 2017

Noah Kaplan demonstrates a miter saw

Leon HQ Tour 2017

Leon's Timbre SEVEN bookshelf speakers

Leon HQ Tour 2017

Leon invested in a machine to shred old boxes into new packing materials

Leon HQ Tour 2017

As part of its Lean Manufacturing, Leon delivers speaker kits to its assemblers in these custom-built cases.

Leon HQ Tour 2017

Wrapping speaker grille cloth

Leon HQ Tour 2017

Putting finishing touch on grille cloth

Leon HQ Tour 2017

Adding the drivers

Leon HQ Tour 2017

Testing a speaker for proper polarity

Leon HQ Tour 2017

The Glowacki family taking a breather in the marketing department

Leon HQ Tour 2017

Noah Kaplan next to a prototype concept in the hallways of his company's headquarters

Leon HQ Tour 2017

Outside Leon's Ann Arbor headquarters