Draper Secures Another ISF Certification

The entire TecVision Engineered Surface Technology line is now ISF certified.
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Draper's TecVision XH900X Grey projection viewing surface has been certified by the Imaging Science Foundation (ISF) for excellent color reproduction and fidelity. XH900X Grey performs very well in moderate ambient light, is well suited for high resolution content, and is 4K ready. The entire TecVision Engineered Surface Technology line is now ISF certified.

To be certified by the ISF, a screen has to have a flat spectral response—or color fidelity. In other words, the screen cannot affect the color of the image enough for the human eye to perceive. Traditionally, projection screens have fooled the eye that things are brighter by using blue tints, according to ISF President and Founder Joel Silver.

“The problem,” said Silver, “is if you accentuate the blue that means you aren’t getting the greens or reds you need to build a color-accurate image. We want to take whatever the artist created and bring it to the screen with fidelity.”

“We basically tie ourselves into something called a pure white matte screen –a screen that is a reference color,” Silver said of testing projection screens for color performance. “Neutral white … not a hint of tint to it. The picture you get is what was it was meant to look like from the factory … not tinted.”

Currently available in six exclusive formulations, TecVision features white surfaces with gains ranging from 1.0 to 1.9 over remarkably wide viewing cones, and grey surfaces with excellent performance under higher room light levels. All TecVision surfaces are also 4K ready, but what most impressed Silver when certifying TecVision is the ability of some of the high gain surfaces to deal with ambient light while preserving color fidelity.

“Finding the color fidelity of high gain materials close to that of no gain materials was wonderful!” Silver said. “Gain without a price to pay is a wonderful thing. I knew from measuring luminance even without the specifications that these screens were high gain, but I wasn’t seeing the penalty of color shift. It’s a great challenge. Adding gain without paying a penalty in color fidelity requires careful engineering. Compliments to the engineer!”

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